One Hour Photo: Hee Jin Kang, Gregory Halpern, Lindsay Page, Alexander Heilner, Nigel Shafran

May 25th, 2010

© One Hour Photo
One Hour Photo
May 8-June 6, 2010
American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington D.C.
Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Tue-Sun
Closing: June 6, 11-4pm

Larissa Leclair has teamed up with One Hour Photo to feature photographers from this exhibition. Read the initial post here. Today’s photographers are Hee Jin Kang, Gregory Halpern, Lindsay Page, Alexander Heilner, and Nigel Shafran.


11-noon: Hee Jin Kang

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Empire – riffed, abbreviated.

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I made a photograph specifically in response to the show’s themes.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
It feels liberating.

Website/Blog: www.heejinkang.com; heejinkang.wordpress.com


12-1pm: Gregory Halpern

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
I really don’t think I can describe the picture in three words.

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
It’s just a first draft of a new idea. I will likely reshoot the idea.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I have mixed feelings.

Website: http://gregoryhalpern.com/


1-2pm: Lindsay Page


2-3pm: Alexander Heilner

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Aerial Development Glut

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
In my case, I was thinking about images that are very representative of my current artwork. I considered several one-off photos that are not part of my current aerial project, but it seemed like a bit of a cop-out. I decided it had to be an image I was currently excited about, and which would be potentially significant in its absence from the group. Having said that, I also ruled out a few of my very favorites, because I think they are important enough to the project that they need to be seen in future iterations.

This group of images consists of aerial views of Cape Coral, Florida, where there are more canals than any other city in the world, and where the housing bubble burst so dramatically in 2008, that there are huge swaths of and that are only partially developed, and will no doubt stay that way for some time to come. Most of the images I’ve been showing are either fairly low vantage points, so that details in the houses are clearly visible, or they are taken from very high, so that the vast extent of the crisis can be seen in geographic terms. The image I am giving up for One Hour Photo is precisely between these extremes. It is the one that tells the whole story at once – the investment of the individual families as well as the societal breadth of the problem. I’m hoping that a viewer will see all of this in the single image.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I feel a connection between the evaporation of wealth that so many people have experienced recently, and the disappearance of this photograph. When this image disappears after its one hour in the spotlight, the 176 homes visible in the picture will go with it. The photograph will cease to be a viable representation of my work, or of Cape Coral, and I will let it go lightly, knowing that many of those 176 homeowners had to give up much more when they were forced to give their keys back to the bank, and start anew on their American dreams.

Website:  http://www.heilner.net


3-4pm: Nigel Shafran

 



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