One Hour Photo: Bryan Ewsichek, Lynley Bernstein, John Vanderslice, Ramon Vega, Zev Schmitz

May 19th, 2010

© One Hour Photo
One Hour Photo
May 8-June 6, 2010
American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington D.C.
Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Tue-Sun

Larissa Leclair has teamed up with One Hour Photo to feature photographers from this exhibition. Read the initial post here. Today’s photographers are Bryan Ewsichek, Lynley Bernstein, John Vanderslice, Ramon Vega, and Zev Schmitz.


11-noon: Bryan Ewsichek

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
colorful, tradition, deflated

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
While I appreciate the concept of the show, and I submitted a photograph that I am proud of… I also realize that the world will not end if no one sees my photo ever again. That said, it elevates the importance of seeing my photo within the hour that it will be projected.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
The particular subject matter of my photograph illustrates the fleeting nature of American traditions and instinctual consumer nature… So it seems appropriate to essentially discard the image.

Website: http://www.ewsichek.com


12-1pm: Lynley Bernstein


1-2pm: John Vanderslice

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Blonde on bronze

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
Ignore the “never be seen again” part.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
C’est la vie.

Website: http://johnvanderslice.com


2-3pm: Ramon Vega


3-4pm: Zev Schmitz

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
The salted inversion

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I find it strange when artists become protective and nostalgic about their work. Anyone who photographs daily or even weekly has amassed an incredible amount of images by years end and should be happy to display the strong images in any occurrence, if only once.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I hope it is well enjoyed.

Website: http://zevschmitz.com


One Hour Photo: Michelle Repiso, Liz Gorman, Danny Treacy, Tyler McPhee, Anna Reich

May 18th, 2010

© One Hour Photo
One Hour Photo
May 8-June 6, 2010
American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington D.C.
Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Tue-Sun

Larissa Leclair has teamed up with One Hour Photo to feature photographers from this exhibition. Read the initial post here. Today’s photographers are Michelle Repiso, Liz Gorman, Danny Treacy, Tyler McPhee, and Anna Reich.


11-noon: Michelle Repiso

 Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
16mm, water, women

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I just finished working on this image and figured it was the right time and place for this to be shown; even if for just one hour.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
We let go of so many things, why shouldn’t this be one of them.

Website: http://www.michellerepiso.com


12-1pm: Liz Gorman


1-2pm: Danny Treacy

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Fertile Ground photogram.

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
It’s good practice to kill your babies every now and then.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
See above.

Website: www.dannytreacy.com


2-3pm: Tyler McPhee

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Playful, Curious, Iconic

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
The images from this series are a set of Bigfoot sightings recontextualized to the former No Man’s Land area between East and West Berlin Germany. I think there’s actually something pretty poetic about the fact that they’ll never be seen again. It’s a fleeting moment, a Bigfoot sighting. Sometimes they’re documented and sometimes they’re just told through a story that substantiates the creatures existence.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I’m really happy that I could share the project with an audience, however anonymous that relationship may be.

Website: http://www.tylermcphee.com


3-4pm: Anna Reich


One Hour Photo: Nicola Kast, Joseph Moore, Lynn Palewicz, Chajana denHarder, Ahndraya Parlato

May 16th, 2010

© One Hour Photo
One Hour Photo
May 8-June 6, 2010
American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington D.C.
Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Tue-Sun

Larissa Leclair has teamed up with One Hour Photo to feature photographers from this exhibition. Read the initial post here. Today’s photographers are Nicola Kast, Joseph Moore, Lynn Palewicz, Chajana denHarder, and Ahndraya Parlato.


11-noon: Nicola Kast


12-1pm: Joseph  Moore


1-2pm: Lynn Palewicz


2-3pm: Chajana denHarder

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
time’s relentless melt

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
You make one with the end in mind.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
“All photographs are memento mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s (or thing’s) mortality, vulnerability, mutability. Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it, all photographs testify to time’s relentless melt.” – Susan Sontag

Website: www.chajana.com


3-4pm: Ahndraya Parlato

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
fleeting

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
outtake

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
resolved

Website: www.ahndrayaparlato.com


One Hour Photo: Edith Maybin, Robert Vizzini, Alisha Kerlin, Wesley Schauble, Nicholas Knight

May 15th, 2010

© One Hour Photo
One Hour Photo
May 8-June 6, 2010
American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington D.C.
Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Tue-Sun

Larissa Leclair has teamed up with One Hour Photo to feature photographers from this exhibition. Read the initial post here. Today’s photographers are Edith Maybin, Robert Vizzini, Alisha Kerlin, Wesley Schauble, and Nicholas Knight.


11-noon: Edith Maybin

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Naked, Blood, Eden

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I love the idea of the photograph, the image which is left in someone’s mind. So choosing to give an image which will never be seen again but in someone’s mind was seductive and I wanted to give one I loved.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I like being related to you even just by a secret.

Website: http://www.edithmaybin.com


12-1pm: Robert Vizzini

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Mysterious, strong, eternal

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
That is just the situation, I wanted the image to be a good one and one that could represent my body of work but one that I am willing to give up to the ages. I must say that it was just an intuitive response to this image when I was going through images to possible use. You can kind of say it chose itself, this image just seemed to jump out at me to be the one.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
In fact it wasn’t that difficult to pick this image. I respect the idea of this project and felt that this was an image that could represent the idea of the fleeting moment of each photograph. Each photo taken is a moment in time recorded that will never appear again. With many of my images being shot at night and low light it is actually a period of time
compressed in one image due to the long exposures.

Website: http://www.robertvizzini.com


1-2pm: Alisha Kerlin

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Discreet, Stalemate, Unplanned

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I’ve played a lot of solitaire and I lose about 60% of the time. Not every game can be turned into a painting, and some look great in photographs.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I think it fits the project. I thinking that looking at a game of solitaire is very different than playing it yourself. Do you look at it for aesthetic reasons like it is a flower arrangement or do you continue to play and check if there is any moves. Letting it go is like realizing you’ve lost the game. Play another.

Website: www.alishakerlin.com


2-3pm: Wesley Schauble


3-4pm: Nicholas Knight

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
“Wall between frames.”

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
It’s easy enough to get over if (a) you have other similar images, (b) you’re convinced that the sacrifice to the concept of the show is worth it, and (c) your practice doesn’t depend on the future availability of any single image.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
The concept of the show is fun and insightful, first of all.  But more importantly, it introduces an ethical dimension to this “social contract” (artist and exhibition production) that generally locates its ethics in a very different way. The “promise not to show again” is something that the artist has complete control over fulfilling, and that ethical autonomy is highly welcome, in direct proportion to its sense of loss. Sort of like asking, “Does One Hour Photo have Buddha Nature?”

Website: www.nicholasknight.net


One Hour Photo: Rhona Bitner, Oliver Wasow, Daniel Temkin, Anthony Fuller, Jack Ryan

May 14th, 2010

© One Hour Photo
One Hour Photo
May 8-June 6, 2010
American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington D.C.
Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Tue-Sun

Larissa Leclair has teamed up with One Hour Photo to feature photographers from this exhibition. Read the initial post here. Today’s photographers are Rhona Bitner, Oliver Wasow, Daniel Temkin, Anthony Fuller, and Jack Ryan.


11-noon: Rhona Bitner


12-1pm: Oliver Wasow


1-2pm: Daniel Temkin

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
competing anachronistic narratives

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I knew it had to be a photo that could stand on its own, since it will be projected by itself. It needed to offer something to study for the length of time it would be projected. So I selected a photo that is highly narrative, one that has a sense of mystery. It tells a rather odd story, that branches out in strange directions as you notice more clues in the frame. I still notice new things I hadn’t seen before, which offer new interpretations.

As for committing to never show it again, I love this photo, and certainly feel a sense of loss letting it go. But since it is an image dealing with the ephemeral nature of memory, giving it a temporary life span seemed fitting, and further underscores its themes.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
It was very freeing to try new things on an image that would be judged alone and then discarded. My images tend to feel as if seen by a neutral observer. This image has more of a playful quality: it’s photographed from an unusual angle that feels like the Earth is falling away at the edge of the frame. It openly implicates the photographer. The color palette is much more stark than is typical for me. However, there are connections to my other work as well: the narrative sense, and the themes of nostalgia and decay.

It has given me some new ideas that I’d like to explore in future work. Although the image won’t be shown again, it may live on through its influence on work I’ll develop moving forward.

Website: http://danieltemkin.com


2-3pm: Anthony Fuller

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
It says goodbye.

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
The image has to be unique. A unique image that is suited for the exhibition and its duration.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I feel good about it because the image fits the concept of the exhibition very well.

Website: www.anthonyhfuller.com


3-4pm: Jack Ryan


One Hour Photo: Andrew de Freitas, Joshua Lovelace, Max Cook, Ryan Barone, Michael Huey

May 13th, 2010

© One Hour Photo
One Hour Photo
May 8-June 6, 2010
American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington D.C.
Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Tue-Sun

Larissa Leclair has teamed up with One Hour Photo to feature photographers from this exhibition. Read the initial post here. Today’s photographers are Andrew de Freitas, Joshua Lovelace, Max Cook, Ryan Barone, Michael Huey.


11-noon: Andrew de Freitas

 

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo  in three words:
Ground between houses.

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
Photography is almost cheating – in its simple form, there’s no such thing as an uninteresting photograph. Even so, there are too many of them. We can’t keep track and we don’t pay any attention to most of them. Exhibition always happens, but knowing that something will never be seen again changes things. We pay more attention.

Archives are amazing; knowing that things are stored and having access to that – but there is also an alluring significance to those rituals that burn something or those ceremonies where the activity is unreproducible and confined to the experience of it. That’s what is happening with these photographs, they become part of a kind of ceremony. I chose this image to be a part of a ceremony.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I hardly had a hold of it anyway. I remember the place* where I took the photograph as having had a profound effect on me, which is why I think I was taking photographs there. I have written about being there, and gone back to photographs as the point of reference. I think that because of these afterthoughts the distinct impression the place left on me has vacated the photographs now and become too mixed-in with other things. I don’t really remember being there, but because of the images I know that I was. Reviewing the photograph allowed me to start with the image and open up the space again by thinking and writing into it. Now the image is all but spent,  it became a kind of a burden. I hoped that for other people there might still be something provocative to recognize in it before it goes.

*One of many incredible grassed space between massive social housing blocks in Petrzalka, across the Danube River from Bratislava.

Website:  www.andrewdefreitas.com 


12-1pm: Joshua Lovelace


1-2pm: Max Cook

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Mysterious, soothing, inviting.

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
For me it was a matter of selecting a photo that I had no emotional attachment to, yet it had to stand on its own in terms of quality to have a chance at being selected for the show. I could have chosen a photo of a hubcap, something that means absolutely nothing to me, but it wouldn’t have been any good and it wouldn’t have been right for One Hour Photo. I selected about six images that I thought were good candidates and tried to imagine them being projected for one hour, and in the end chose one that I thought fit the show’s suggested theme more than the others. I think each photographer’s selection and their selection process reveals a lot about them as a person.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
Letting go of something goes completely against my nature. I tend to hold on to things as long as I can because they have special meaning to me or because I might need them one day. I keep receipts just in case there is an issue with my credit card bill (there never has been). I keep boxes so that I can use them the next time I move. I’ve kept a sweatshirt full of holes that is ten years old because it reminds me of a time in my life that I don’t want to forget. I’m not a hoarder, but I certainly don’t like letting go.

I’ve experienced a lot of loss this year, so it makes me nervous to be losing something else. Permanent loss is a tough concept to grasp until it actually happens to you, and then it’s still hard to believe that something, or someone, is gone forever. However, letting go of this photo is refreshing in a way – to go against my inner instincts, to release control, and to do it with something as insignificant as a digital file. Yet in the process of letting it go, and by being a part of this show, the memory of this photo will be seared into my mind forever. So in a way I’m not losing anything.

Website: www.maxcookphotography.com


2-3pm: Ryan Barone

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Several photographic cliches.

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
With reckless abandon.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
Parting is such sweet sorrow.

Website: http://ryanbarone.com; http://ryanbarone.tumblr.com


3-4pm: Michael Huey

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Destruction of Letters

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
The idea of actively extinguishing or voiding a work of mine at first went against all my instincts. Among other things, I was concerned, when I first considered which work I might submit, that I would be led to choose a second-rate piece; something, in effect, I didn’t mind parting with so much. That seemed an untenable position to me and led to a period of examining what qualities make up a work created with ‘forever’ in mind and, by contrast, which ‘qualities’ a one-hour photo might possess. I decided that I was curious about producing an image to satisfy these (to me) unfamiliar criteria. What kind of piece might become complete only by vanishing? What sort of image might have its value relationships heightened – the way a painting’s value relationships are heightened through manipulation of color – by the fact of its own impending demise? I was thinking of afterglow – of bright colors that linger and grow after the eyes are closed. I considered resonances – how chords hang in the air after they have been played.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
My work is mostly about legacy and loss, often loss in the framework of family history. Usually, I find myself in the position of trying to save or redeem something, rather than consigning it to oblivion. With that in mind, I eventually decided to submit to One Hour Photo an image of an item someone actively wished to have destroyed. (The title of my submission is Letters Someone Wanted to Have Destroyed.) In the past, I have declined to destroy the letters themselves, which I own, and which are a correspondence between my mother and a high school boyfriend (but neither do I feel comfortable reading them – a state of limbo that often occurs in the course of my work). Showing the image for an hour and then allowing it to slip away could be a beneficial act of substitution; a symbolic and necessary act like breaking a bottle of champagne over the prow of a ship.

This exercise asked me to think about a short lifespan, rather than one of eons: an infancy, maturaton, and conclusion all within an hour’s time. Like a fruit fly in a petri dish, the work is born, takes wing, demonstrates its fertility, passes along everything it’s got, and then – spent – falls away, like a husk.

 
Website: www.michaelhuey.com


One Hour Photo: Rachel Stevens, Jade Doskow, Orr Shtuhl, Kenny George, Andrew Bovasso

May 12th, 2010

© One Hour Photo
One Hour Photo
May 8-June 6, 2010
American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington D.C.
Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Tue-Sun

Larissa Leclair has teamed up with One Hour Photo to feature photographers from this exhibition. Read the initial post here. Today’s photographers are Rachel Stevens, Jade Doskow, Orr Shtuhl, Kenny George, and Andrew Bovasso.


11-noon: Rachel Stevens

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
“In Real Life”

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I picked an image that I felt embodied (so to speak) the One Hour Photo concept. The image looks like a performance, but was really a candid moment at an afternoon art event that was all about the ephemeral—collective/collaborative online projects and alternative exhibition practices. I really love this image, but it works better as a digital image rather than a print—it has soft focus, etc. The short-term projection will do it justice.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
The image was made at an exhibition called “In Real Life” — an exhibition of alternative, online, ephemeral projects (http://www.letsmeetinreallife.com/). There was a series of “residencies” that took the space of a few hours at Capricious Space, an independent publisher in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The afternoon the photo was taken, “Private Circulation” was in residence. Private Circulation periodically emails an artist project as a PDF to a private mailing list. They were projecting a digital slideshow of pieces by artists that have been included in their project. My friend who had contributed a Private Circulation project was sitting with his girlfriend and another mutual friend, each reading the printed newspaper-like piece that had the title of the show on it “In Real Life.”  The shifting afternoon light came into the room at an angle and my friends had been drinking herbal tea. As you can see, the set-up was already organized around the ephemeral, so it seemed appropriate and natural to give this image up to the ether as part of another conceptual exhibition.

Personally, I have always been interested in the ephemeral and often work with perishable or contingent materials. I like photography precisely because it lets you hold on to that instant that will never be back again. I’m happy to be a part of an exhibition that celebrates ephemerality and embraces contemporary conditions of photography.

Website: www.rachelstevens.net


12-1pm: Jade Doskow

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
glowing, ethereal, golden

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I selected an image from a project examining the ethereality of time and structure (a series of photographs examining the remains of world’s fair sites internationally); therefore conceptually it made perfect sense. It is also an image that is best projected and not made into a flat photograph; it glows in a very special but temporal way.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I feel I sometimes think of my work in too precious a way, as a result of the months I often spend working on one photograph. My exhibition photographs ultimately are large, expensive material objects with a lot of gravity. It felt freeing and contrary to my usual way of thinking to give an image—and one of the most beautiful images from the project—a tiny life-span, and an immaterial one at that.

Website: www.jadedoskowphotography.com


1-2pm: Orr Shtuhl


2-3pm: Kenny George

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Hot, Sticky, Delicious

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I just picked something I want people to see. No different than I would for any other exhibition.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
There will be others.

Website: www.kennethdgeorge.com


3-4pm: Andrew Bovasso

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
father, gravestone, me.

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
For a while, I considered the piece my primary self portrait. The image is ambiguous. At first glance, it appears to be a self portrait with strange cropping on the top edge, as you look at the image more in-depth, in relation to the title, Looking at Death, Eyes Open, you may realize the upper edge is actually the top of the gravestone.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I never wanted to see this image again. At the point of the submissions for the show, I had made the decision to create less work dealing with such dark and personal subject matter, in order to move toward a more universal understanding of what I could do with photography.

Website/Blog: bovasso.blogspot.com


One Hour Photo: Andrea Gohl, Renee Rendine, Charles Benton, Kate Gorman, Edouard Crotti

May 11th, 2010

© One Hour Photo

One Hour Photo
May 8-June 6, 2010
American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington D.C.
Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Tue-Sun

Larissa Leclair has teamed up with One Hour Photo to feature photographers from this exhibition. Read the initial post here. Today’s photographers are Andrea Gohl, Renee Rendine, Charles Benton, Kate Gorman, and Edouard Crotti.


11-noon: Andrea Gohl


12-1pm: Renee Rendine

 


1-2pm: Charles Benton

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Don’t remember it

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I chose one photo from a series of very similar photos. Maybe this defeats the purpose of the exhibition to an extent, but it reflects a tendency in my work–I often deal with the reproducibility of images in my projects, trying to diffuse the singularity or singular significance of any image, either at the point of initial production (while photographing, as with the image for this show) or the end of that process (in the printing/display/exhibition of the images/image-objects).  I am interested in the tension between my work’s goals and the exhibit’s, I am glad I could participate.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I am not attached to it, there will always be more images. I do wish I could see it before its gone though.

Website: www.charlesbenton.net


2-3pm: Kate Gorman

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
gray, pause, red

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I chose a photo with diagonals and one vivid color so the elements of the image would stay in my head long after the exhibit was over.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I like it. It reminds me that the photo wasn’t really here to begin with.

Website: www.headsticks.com


3-4pm: Edouard Crotti

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Lines, lights, contrast

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
Everything has to disappear. I like this concept. “Film Noir” is something unique, non-repetitive, ephemeral. “Film Noir” structure is adapted for a short life but also to stay in the collective memory.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
First, I would like to thank all the curators – Adam Good, Chajana denHarder, and Chandi Kelley. I’m proud to contribute to One Hour Photo. For me it’s important to be a part of the edifice. “Film Noir” is taken from photographic work still in progress,”Silhouette & Abandoned garage.”

Website: www.photoshelter.com/c/edouardcrotti


One Hour Photo: Mandira Sareen, Page Carr, Sven Weigel, Rhys Thom, Nancy Daly

May 9th, 2010

© One Hour Photo

One Hour Photo
May 8-June 6, 2010
American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington D.C.
Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Tue-Sun

Larissa Leclair has teamed up with One Hour Photo to feature photographers from this exhibition. Read the initial post here. Today’s photographers are Mandira Sareen, Page Carr, Sven Weigel, Rhys Thom, and Nancy Daly.


11-noon: Mandira Sareen

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
missing, finding, letting go

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
…coming from a place of nothing.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
…no past in the future, only here and now, accepting as it is and is not.

Website: in the shop www.meditativespaces.com launch Fall 2010


12-1pm: Page Carr

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
something in fog

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
One looks through tons of existing work for an image that people might spend an hour looking at, or at least more than 20 seconds. One also wonders how bright the space and the projector will be.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
It’s like letting go of a helium balloon, but you might want to ask me again on Sunday after 1 pm.

Website: pagecarr.com


1-2pm: Sven Weigel

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
-

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
The idea of “never be seen again” becomes part of the selected piece, makes another layer on it and creates a completely different picture. Selecting the piece starts an inspiring process inside: looking at something with the knowledge that nobody will ever see it again. Like the last sunset every day.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
-

Website: -


2-3pm: Rhys Thom

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
shadows growing long

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I wanted a piece that reflected the concept of the show. It was great to take a second look at my past photos and see them through that lens.  So much of photography can be about stopping a moment in time and preserving it. The image that I ultimately choose embodies this intent. By choosing to never show it again I’m challenging my own impulse to use photography as a way to stop or delay the inevitable forward movement and progression of time.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I’m fine with it. Once I made up my mind that this was the photo I would use, it was easy. It’s been fun describing the image to people with words rather than showing it to them.

Website: http://photos.rhysthom.com/c/rhys


3-4pm: Nancy Daly


One Hour Photo: Noel Rodo-Vankeulen, Megan Cump, and Tim Davis

May 8th, 2010

© One Hour Photo

One Hour Photo
May 8-June 6, 2010
American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington D.C.
Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Tue-Sun
Opening: May 8, 6-9pm
Closing: June 6, 11-4pm

One Hour Photo, curated by Adam Good, Chajana denHarder, and Chandi Kelley, opens tonight at the Katzen in Washington, DC. Quoting from the website, “[t]he premise of One Hour Photo is simple: project a photograph for one hour, then ensure that it will never be seen again… Each work will exist only in the limited moments of perception, in the individual and collective experience, then memory, of the observers.” Read more about the exhibition here. In conjunction with this project, Larissa Leclair has asked each photographer to respond to the same three questions – describe the photograph in three words, talk about the selection process, and thoughts on letting go of the image. The photographers’ responses will be posted the day their photograph is being projected at the Katzen – 26 days, 128 photographers. See the entire schedule and list of photographers here. The photographers’ responses may provide a glimpse of the projected image, but more so their answers seem to reveal more about the photographers themselves. Opening night starts off with Noel Rodo-Vankeulen, Megan Cump, and Tim Davis.


6-7pm: Noel Rodo-Vankeulen

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Luminous and polymorphic

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
Instead of just selecting an outtake from a previous series, or simply an ‘extra’ image from my archives, I decided to create a photograph that addressed the idea of the exhibition. I wanted to make an image that could be dismissed, was easily read and referenced itself as a projection – essentially a work that straddles a line between what is considered art and the obviousness of its situation.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I really don’t have a problem with it. While it seems recently that there is this fear about losing the physical print within photography, that is, our current practice of experiencing photographs primarily on a screen, I was drawn to the idea of making a work that subverts both sides of the argument.

It is a photograph, but it’s presented as an image. It is in a physical exhibition, but the structures of how the work and the show itself are consumed (looking, documenting, purchasing, etc) are very much twisted. I think of One Hour Photo as more of a performance and less like a slideshow.

Website: www.nrodo-vankeulen.com


7-8pm: Megan Cump

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Sea of flames

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
My selection process was guided by a desire to exhibit an image that captured something utterly fleeting and mutable.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I am content to let the image go – photography’s capacity to render the unseen visible is what first drew me to the medium and this project brings that notion full circle.

Website: www.megancump.com


8-9pm: Tim Davis

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Rental Home Mailbox

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
The same way people used to write poems and then throw them in the Seine. By going home and writing them again.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
In a digital age, letting go is easy to do.

Website: www.davistim.com


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