One Hour Photo: Thomas Michael Corcoran, Gelare Khoshgozaran, Zac Willis, Linda Plaisted, Susannah Slocum

May 21st, 2010

© One Hour Photo
One Hour Photo
May 8-June 6, 2010
American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington D.C.
Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Tue-Sun

Larissa Leclair has teamed up with One Hour Photo to feature photographers from this exhibition. Read the initial post here. Today’s photographers are Thomas Michael Corcoran, Gelare Khoshgozaran, Zac Willis, Linda Plaisted, and Susannah Slocum.


11-noon: Thomas Michael Corcoran

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
Time Standing Still

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I selected a recent photo that I thought was most relevant to the concept of this opening. It is a night shot of a crosswalk signal in Jangandong; a neighborhood of the Dongdaemun district of Seoul. Behind the cross walk sign is a sign for one of the literally tens of thousands of ??? (no rae bahng), or karaoke clubs, that are open 24 hours a day there. The presence of the ??? adds some meaningful dimension to this photo, in that these singing rooms are rented by the hour. It is a place where children go to sing and hangout for an hour between school and private lessons, but it is also the place friends most often find themselves in the last hour of a night of eating and drinking. It is a symbolic hour. It is a defining hour. It is a forgotten hour.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I think if one person sees it and understands it in the hour that it is displayed, it will have served it’s purpose well.

Website/Blog: http://blog.thomasmichaelcorcoran.com/


12-1pm: Gelare Khoshgozaran

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
\?j? – m – p\

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
Being “good”, if a “good and compelling image” is what you mean by that, does not necessarily mean it has to be “eternally accessible”. It happens a lot in life when you see something, a place, a moment, a person, a situation that you wish you could take a picture of. But just as you are thinking, it is already gone. And that is when a desire, a certain kind of longing makes you try to “remember”.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
I have already let go of that “jump”; letting go of its image is not an issue.a

Website:  -


1-2pm: Zac Willis


2-3pm: Linda Plaisted

Describe the photograph selected for One Hour Photo in three words:
dreamlike, narrative, journey

How does one go about selecting a photograph that is good enough for an exhibition but that can never be seen again?
I created my piece “Traveler” for the One Hour Photo Project in honor of my father who passed away recently and who also can never be seen again. In going back through my archived body of work considering images for this project, I also glanced through folders of faded family photographs. Attempting to layer past and present, I placed a boyhood image of my father into the context of one of my existing landscape pieces, fusing context and subtext, past and present. Now the young boy who my father once was and the woman I have become can somehow still go on together toward a future horizon; existing along parallel lines in this constructed, hybrid world.

What are your thoughts on letting go of this image?
Letting go of an image seems a small thing in comparison to letting go of the people you love.

Website: http://lindaplaisted.com


3-4pm: Susannah Slocum


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